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Energy efficient fridge

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Energy efficient fridge

Posted 01 Jan '11 07:23 AM

Does anyone know where in NZ I can buy an energy efficient fridge like Liebherr or similar?

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 01 Jan '11 10:40 AM

Award Appliance Group 388-390 Blenheim Road PO Box 6269, Upper Riccarton Christchurch 0 3 348 0556 sales@award.co.nz www.awardappliances.co.nz are listed as the New Zealand agents for Liebherr appliances on the international Liebherr website.

A quick search on New Zealand websites for Liebherr appliances finds some models stocked by: Kitchen Things 0800 754 222 http://www.kitchenthings.net.nz/contact.html

To check the energy efficiency ratings of appliances found in New Zealand have a look on this website: http://www.eeca.govt.nz/products

and this website has Australia and New Zealand stcked products: http://www.energyrating.gov.au/appsearch/refrig_srch.asp

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 02 Jan '11 03:05 AM

Energy efficient fridges: is "GRAM" of interest?

Try Independent Power (NZ) Ltd

http://www.indepower.co.nz/old/index.html


Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 02 Jan '11 03:28 AM

Never heard of GRAM. Where is it made? Are the stars the new or the old rating?

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 03 Jan '11 12:10 AM

A search found a few NZ suppliers of Gram. They seem to be off grid power specialists who sell low energy fridges. There may be others: http://www.quadrixenergy.co.nz/gramM60.pdf http://currentgeneration.co.nz/site/current/files/gram%20models.pdf http://www.indepower.co.nz/old/fridges.html

I think Gram is a Danish company, that specialises in commercial fridges.

Because these are government sites I believe they are using the up-to-date new star rating. I seem to remember the Australian one having a cross-over period when they showed both old and new star ratings for a while.

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 12 Dec '11 06:50 PM

Is this forum only about commercial advertising?? Or are you ready to put hands-on yourself? Here you can see how you reduce your fridges power consumption down to 50% WITHOUT buying a new one: http://coolfridge.blogspot.com/

Allen

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 12:39 AM

Allen

I have no links with Gram other than that is the one I purchased as a customer at full retail price. This blogsite is about discussing ways to be more "eco" in a variety of settings.

In your other posts: saying that you only use 500kWh of electricity a year, and then posting there is another 2163kWh of gas you failed to mention initially seems a bit of an oversight. Here in NZ we have about 80% renewable electricity generation last year: probably better to use electricity rather than gas for a whole lot of applications!!!

Seeker "Seeking the total energy solution". (Still.......)

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 12:39 AM

Allen

I have no links with Gram other than that is the one I purchased as a customer at full retail price. This blogsite is about discussing ways to be more "eco" in a variety of settings.

In your other posts: saying that you only use 500kWh of electricity a year, and then posting there is another 2163kWh of gas you failed to mention initially seems a bit of an oversight. Here in NZ we have about 80% renewable electricity generation last year: probably better to use electricity rather than gas for a whole lot of applications!!!

Seeker "Seeking the total energy solution". (Still.......)

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 08:12 AM

Dear seeker,

i am happy to hear that you use so much renewable energy in your country. Germany as a densly populated and industrial country struggles much more with that. What matters electricity germany did reach 17% this year. Aims are very ambitious in the future but we will see.

You are not right, cause i did mention in my other post in the beginning, that heating is extra: "We are 2 persons, 83m², electric stove, gas heating and we need 500kWh per year!." But you are right, that its dificult to compare nz-households and german housholds for many reasons. I should be more aware of that. ;) I am happy that i am allowed to discuss things in such a nice forum.

Allen

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 08:37 AM

:-)

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 09:43 AM

At what point do you think adding extra insulation will have diminishing returns?


Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 10:01 AM

What do you mean by diminishing returns?

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 10:22 AM

Do you think adding another inch or 2 of insulation would save you any more energy?

At some point adding extra insulation doesn't make much difference, Anybody know how to apply the maths for this?

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 03:37 PM

Hi nzspark, the math for this is of course difficult in reality. But for simplicity reasons we can presume that one is not opening the fridge at all and one puts insulation evenly around the fridge (which would be almost impossible for example at the seals). Now the math would be like that: every time one doubles the layer of insulation one would cut down power consumption by 50%. My layer of original insulation was only about 2cm, so adding 2cm did cut down half of the power consumption (about 120kWh less a year). So if you would turn a freezer into a fridge and it would take only 40kWh a year i guess it would not be worth to add another 7 or 8cm of insulation to reach 20kWh a year.

Greetings. Allen.

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 07:07 PM

i read a blog about someone living offgrid,and trying to reduce his fridge power consumption. he eventually converted a chest freezer to a fridge,as they use very little power.the vertical fridges use a lot more power as the cold "falls out " the door every time you open it.

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 08:10 PM

Hi nzspark

How much of this page (see link below) can you understand? There are people on this forum (myself included) who can walk you through this if you tell us what you need:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_transmittance

Seeker

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 14 Dec '11 11:28 PM

Hello ‘seeker’ ‘nzspark’ and ‘Allen’,

As a kiln designer, I can see where ‘nzspark’ is coming from in ‘diminishing returns’.

A Raku kiln constructed of very expensive 40mm high efficiency ceramic fibre can fire to 1300oC in 30 minuets with the exterior surface measuring 200oC radiant heat when it ceases its firing cycle. It is not economically viable to increase the wall thickness to 80mm to ‘save’ some radiated energy as the capital cost outweighs the energy saving over the life of the kiln.

The reverse is true for a continuously operating 1300oC Tunnel kiln producing bricks, which could have 400mm insulation to keep the exterior radiant energy close to ambient 30oC. A large energy input is initially required to heat the insulation to a balanced state, but once heated, little additional energy is require to maintain that state.

Now the exercise that Allen is promoting suggests changing an existing refrigerator design to something the original designers did not intend, or they would have increased the insulation to start with. Maybe there is a case for them to do so. If Allen chooses to spend his time at $?? / hour to do this conversion and can justify his effort against energy saving, then it is an interesting exercise but not one that most of us would consider viable. Either the capacity inside is reduced or the exterior is increased and both are undesirable for most of us.

I prefer to improve the highest energy users first, such as an insulation wrap to the hot water cylinder and a plasma TV to LED, but the trade off is always a capital cost comparison to energy used and not being a slave to reduce energy use at any cost.

Rex

Re: Energy efficient fridge

Posted 15 Dec '11 08:22 AM

Hi sceptics,

you do honour your name ;). I agree not anybody would or could do what i have done. I got my reasons and just wanted to share a successful experiment. 1.In my case it was just pleasure to do this work, cause i like that type of work. I buildt furniture too, i did do an apprenticeship in building electric engines and so on. Thats why i dont count my working time in $ (as i do write at my blog: http://coolfridge.blogspot.com/) 2. The original designers intend to sale fridges not more not less. Customers especially 20years ago dont want fridges with thick walls, they want small fridges with huge space inside. It would cost only cents for the producer to add extra-insulation, but they are afraid that it does not sell. 3. In my situation i did have the choice: continuing wiht high energy consumption, buying a new fridge which or insulating the old one. I did have space around the fridge so i did use it for styropor. The inner space is only marginally smaller and as before the new insulation most of the space in the fridge is not used but is just air. 4. I agree with you that one should "not be a slave" as you call it and one should start reducing energy with the highest energy users first. My overall power consumption of my household is about 500kWh per year (water and space heating are done with gas by the landlord so that is extra.). That means a fridge that takes 247kWh a year makes half of it. So i insulated the fridge, now it takes only 130, reduces my electricity bill by a bit more than 1/5th.

Most efficient of course would be reducing the energy bill of people who use 15.000kWh a year, an incredible amount, but everybody is his own chief even though we live in the same world and have to carry the consequences together.

Greetings. Allen.

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